Author Archives: Charlotte


Mental Health Awareness Week

Mental Health Awareness Week

Mental Health Awareness Week

“1 in 4 adults in the UK feel lonely some or all of the time”

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week, and the theme this year is loneliness. The idea is to explore the experience of loneliness, it’s effect on our mental health and how we can all try to tackle loneliness in our local communities.

 

Loneliness is more prominent now than ever. As we draw towards the end of the pandemic having spent the last few years isolating people are really feeling the impact, with loneliness being one of the leading issues that the public feels need to be addressed.  

 

Mark Rowland, Chief Executive of the Mental Health Foundation, said: “Loneliness is affecting more and more of us in the UK and has had a huge impact on our physical and mental health during the pandemic.  That is why we have chosen it as our theme for Mental Health Awareness Week 2022.  Our connection to other people and our community is fundamental to protecting our mental health so we much find better ways of tackling the epidemic of loneliness. We can all play a part in this.  The week is also an invaluable opportunity for people to talk about all aspects of mental health, with a focus on providing help and advice.”  

Here at Komplex Care, we always put the individual first and during our first assessment we identify aspirations and goals. We have mental health nurses who are experienced with Emerging Personality Disorder, Schizophrenia, Anxiety Disorder, Mood Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

“1 in 4 adults in the UK feel lonely some or all of the time”

 

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week, and the theme this year is loneliness. The idea is to explore the experience of loneliness, it’s effect on our mental health and how we can all try to tackle loneliness in our local communities.

Loneliness is more prominent now than ever. As we draw towards the end of the pandemic having spent the last few years isolating people are really feeling the impact, with loneliness being one of the leading issues that the public feels need to be addressed.  

Mark Rowland, Chief Executive of the Mental Health Foundation, said: “Loneliness is affecting more and more of us in the UK and has had a huge impact on our physical and mental health during the pandemic.  That is why we have chosen it as our theme for Mental Health Awareness Week 2022.  Our connection to other people and our community is fundamental to protecting our mental health so we much find better ways of tackling the epidemic of loneliness. We can all play a part in this.  The week is also an invaluable opportunity for people to talk about all aspects of mental health, with a focus on providing help and advice.”  

Here at Komplex Care, we always put the individual first and during our first assessment we identify aspirations and goals. We have mental health nurses who are experienced with Emerging Personality Disorder, Schizophrenia, Anxiety Disorder, Mood Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Bruce Willis, Chris Kamara and their battle with Aphasia 

Bruce Willis, Chris Kamara and their battle with Aphasia

Bruce Willis, Chris Kamara and their battle with Aphasia

Aphasia is a condition that affects sufferers’ cognitive abilities with the most obvious problems in speech. Both Bruce Willis and Chris Kamara have revealed they suffer from Aphasia. Consequently, Bruce Willis has chosen to retire from acting and Chris Kamara has decided to temporarily step away from his role as a reporter on matches for Soccer Saturday. This came after fans recognised a change in his speech after a television appearance. Both stars have received lots of support from fellow celebrities and fans. Speech and language therapy is the main type of treatment for people with Aphasia.

Aphasia is a condition that affects sufferers’ cognitive abilities with the most obvious problems in speech. Both Bruce Willis and Chris Kamara have revealed they suffer from Aphasia. Consequently, Bruce Willis has chosen to retire from acting and Chris Kamara has decided to temporarily step away from his role as a reporter on matches for Soccer Saturday. This came after fans recognised a change in his speech after a television appearance. Both stars have received lots of support from fellow celebrities and fans. Speech and language therapy is the main type of treatment for people with Aphasia.

Brain Tumour Research Fundraiser Wear a Hat Day and Raffle

Brain Tumour Research Fundraiser

Wear a Hat Day and Raffle

Brain Tumour Research Fundraiser

Wear a Hat Day and Raffle

Throughout March, we teamed up with Komplex Health to fundraise for Brain Tumour Research taking part in their Wear A Hat Day campaign as well as hosting our very own raffle. A number of local and national businesses donated prizes for our raffle including a bungee jump, a paragliding experience, restaurant vouchers, food and drink hampers and many more! Overall, we raised a total of £664 for Brain Tumour Research. We are so thankful for the generosity of everyone who donated and entered our raffle.

Brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer, yet just 1% of the national spend on cancer research has been allocated to brain tumour research. We have clients with brain injuries and tumours so we recognise the importance of raising awareness and funding into research for this devastating disease.

Wear a Hat Day

Wear a Hat Day

Photographed: (Left to Right) Lindsay Haylor, Amy Bailey and Gemma Bennett

Wear a Hat Day took place on March 25th where we hosted a Mad Hatter’s Tea Party open to our staff and clients to raise money for Brain Tumour Research. We had lots of fun wearing our hats to raise awareness for Brain Tumour Research!

Raffle

Raffle

Photographed: (Left to Right) Amy Bailey and Dan Harris

After a hugely successful month of ticket sales for our raffle selling over 500 tickets, we announced our winners on April 1st in the form of a Facebook livestream. Our prize winners were very happy!

A Reflection on Supporting People with Complex Needs during the Pandemic.

A Reflection on Supporting People with Complex Needs during the Pandemic

A Reflection on Supporting People with Complex Needs during the Pandemic.

Arron Zaib, Managing Director of Komplex Care Telford, reflects on supporting people with complex needs during the pandemic.

 

January 2020, with the chimes of Big Ben in our ears we were all looking forward to the new year and our plans for the future. Only a few understood the magnitude of what lay ahead. Pre-pandemic the care of people with complex health needs had been challenging for all health care providers. Working with clinically diverse people with multiple conditions, Komplex Care are one of the few specialists’ providers who care for individuals that require home ventilation. Spinal Cord Injury, Muscular Sclerosis, Motor Neurone Disease are some of the conditions we can support people to live at home. The care packages that we deliver are individual to the client’s specific needs with both clinical and operational oversight. We employee registered nurses to train and clinically manage our care packages for both adults and paediatric clients.

As a specialist provider we can deliver care packages for a range of complex conditions. From the outset, our clients with impaired respiratory function were particularly vulnerable if they were to contract Covid 19. As the Pandemic has progressed through its various stages another hurdle to over come was how we manage the use of PPE in the care packages where clients have Complex Mental Health needs. The wearing of masks meant some behavioural changes were observed, to alleviate this we were able to access transparent masks. Having a team that are solution based in there thinking has helped us through the many challenges we have encountered.

 

Working in complex care requires planning and managed processes to ensure the safety of our clients and staff, as we entered February providers like ourselves were in full planning mode and drawing up contingencies on how the pandemic may affect us. Our orders of PPE were made well in advance and our stock levels looked healthy. Our infection control policy was reviewed by our lead clinicians and redistributed amongst our workforces. Our clients and staff were concerned, we were at the front line and seeing healthcare professionals in other countries without PPE contracting Covid-19 and becoming seriously unwell and in some cases dying, this was heightening all our anxieties. We had attempted to cover as many bases as possible.

As the prime minister announced that the United Kingdom was going into Lockdown all hell broke loose. Ours PPE suppliers cancelled our orders guidance changed daily we were unable to get clear guidance from Public Health England and we as providers were attempting to manage clients who were by the nature of their conditions extremely vulnerable to this disease. One of our challenges was appropriate masks, FFP2 FFP3 KN95 these were products most had never heard of and obtaining them had become next to impossible. Most complex services are commissioned by the Clinical Commissioning Groups, and I know providers sought guidance and support, but they were in the same position and could only guide us to local resilience forums that were hit and miss and varied in their ability to help in different areas of the country. We were worked closely with the Care Quality Commission, they were always willing to support when needed.

The working from home guidance raised more issues, a considerable proportion of our workforce had children and with schools now closed had no childcare provision in place and were unable to attend work, once the essential worker list was implemented the impact of this greatly reduced.

The dedication and commitment shown by the care workforce has been underestimated. As frontline care workers supporting some of the most vulnerable in our society, they took a heavy load and reduced the pressure on the NHS during the pandemic. For too long over multiple governments a division has been created between NHS staff and its perceived lesser cousins working in health and social care, this was again highlighted with the initial clap for the NHS, I was so pleased to see this adopted for all frontline Key workers. The CARE badge was meant to help with the levelling up between Health and Social care and The NHS, although the idea was positive in reality this was merely a gesture, I wear mine daily with pride, “My badge of Honour” as an ex- Health Minister coined. This led to an urgent question in Parliament on the matter by Lord Rogan. In total 15,000 were distributed before supplies ran out. In the United Kingdom we have 1.5 million care workers, giving only 1% of care staff access to one. Until Health and Social Care and the NHS are treated equally the divide will remain.

During the Pandemic at Komplex Care we took the decision that keeping our clients and staff safe was the priority, we did not actively look take on new business. This was not the same for all care providers. Recruiting staff in all areas of care is a challenge but finding resolute and committed people that want to take the level of responsibility required to care for our clients is exceptionally hard.

Recruitment of fresh staff declined during the pandemic. This led us to only commit to our current client group. We initially had an influx of applications from candidates that had never worked in care those inspired to help others and those that had unfortunately lost an income and were not entitled to government support schemes. The recruitment of new care staff during the lockdowns proposed new questions, how can we deliver training? A whole new training plan and how we would deliver it was devised to equip our workforce with the appropriate skills to deliver high quality care. We also embraced technology, Zoom Teams, and the like, but we have gone even further forward, digital care planning E-mar, Virtual assessment, and web-based recruitment. Implementing technology gives us a greater oversite and flexibility for our clients in the delivery of their care. This has also reduced our carbon Footprint; we are doing our bit!

 

Our clients and their families have all seen Covid in different ways, just the same as the rest of the UK and the world! we have some clients that have been and remain very cautious, those that were advised to shield but decided against it, some that think its and over reaction. The one constant has been their understanding that we were dealing with a threat that no one had the full facts and our guidance and advise was and remains likely to change. When the PPE supply chains eased, it went from one extreme to another. The operational and logistical skills demonstrated by my teams would rival some of the multinational delivery companies, I can see the picture now of our staff fully kitted in personal protective equipment transferring other kit into each other’s cars in supermarket car parks and lonely motorway services.

The long-awaited white paper on the future of social care “People at The Heart of Care” was published by the government in December 2021. The paper proposes just as many questions as it has attempted to resolve. All staff either working within Health and Care must be rewarded appropriately. The costs associated in delivering care have risen during the pandemic, it is not only staff pay that needs to rise a commitment to care providers is required so we are able to offer better terms and conditions.

 

As we came out of Lockdowns, Komplex Care have received many enquiries for our services, this is obviously a good thing for our business, however we have heard from some of these new enquiries they have not received a good standard of care, which is extremely sad to hear in our industry. At Komplex Care we ensure ‘care’ is at the heart of everything we do, it must be safe, and it must be the best for our clients. Commissioning Teams are inundating us with referrals, they are really struggling to find care provision. Our ability to take on new business is driven by recruitment, whether it be, nursing assistants, support workers, registered nurses, operational support, and even recruiters, Healthcare is not an easy industry to work in and with the new variant of Omicron this may potentially get worse before it gets better. The compulsory vaccination for our sector will also have an impact. We take this into account with all new applications and have seen candidates withdraw when advised it will be a requirement. Many of our client group will not accept staff if they have not received the Covid – 19 vaccines. At Komplex Care we promote choice and look to support our clients and staff. The uptake of vaccine has been high with our current workforce, and we have worked on providing factual information for any of our staff and clients that required any additional advice. I think the communication on the benefits and reasoning why we vaccinate the health and social care frontline workers would have been a far better way to keep all healthcare staff engaged and committed to the vaccine role out.

Arron Zaib, Managing Director of Komplex Care Telford, reflects on supporting people with complex needs during the pandemic.

 

January 2020, with the chimes of Big Ben in our ears we were all looking forward to the new year and our plans for the future. Only a few understood the magnitude of what lay ahead. Pre-pandemic the care of people with complex health needs had been challenging for all health care providers. Working with clinically diverse people with multiple conditions, Komplex Care are one of the few specialists’ providers who care for individuals that require home ventilation. Spinal Cord Injury, Muscular Sclerosis, Motor Neurone Disease are some of the conditions we can support people to live at home. The care packages that we deliver are individual to the client’s specific needs with both clinical and operational oversight. We employee registered nurses to train and clinically manage our care packages for both adults and paediatric clients.

As a specialist provider we can deliver care packages for a range of complex conditions. From the outset, our clients with impaired respiratory function were particularly vulnerable if they were to contract Covid 19. As the Pandemic has progressed through its various stages another hurdle to over come was how we manage the use of PPE in the care packages where clients have Complex Mental Health needs. The wearing of masks meant some behavioural changes were observed, to alleviate this we were able to access transparent masks. Having a team that are solution based in there thinking has helped us through the many challenges we have encountered.

 

Working in complex care requires planning and managed processes to ensure the safety of our clients and staff, as we entered February providers like ourselves were in full planning mode and drawing up contingencies on how the pandemic may affect us. Our orders of PPE were made well in advance and our stock levels looked healthy. Our infection control policy was reviewed by our lead clinicians and redistributed amongst our workforces. Our clients and staff were concerned, we were at the front line and seeing healthcare professionals in other countries without PPE contracting Covid-19 and becoming seriously unwell and in some cases dying, this was heightening all our anxieties. We had attempted to cover as many bases as possible.

As the prime minister announced that the United Kingdom was going into Lockdown all hell broke loose. Ours PPE suppliers cancelled our orders guidance changed daily we were unable to get clear guidance from Public Health England and we as providers were attempting to manage clients who were by the nature of their conditions extremely vulnerable to this disease. One of our challenges was appropriate masks, FFP2 FFP3 KN95 these were products most had never heard of and obtaining them had become next to impossible. Most complex services are commissioned by the Clinical Commissioning Groups, and I know providers sought guidance and support, but they were in the same position and could only guide us to local resilience forums that were hit and miss and varied in their ability to help in different areas of the country. We were worked closely with the Care Quality Commission, they were always willing to support when needed.

The working from home guidance raised more issues, a considerable proportion of our workforce had children and with schools now closed had no childcare provision in place and were unable to attend work, once the essential worker list was implemented the impact of this greatly reduced.

The dedication and commitment shown by the care workforce has been underestimated. As frontline care workers supporting some of the most vulnerable in our society, they took a heavy load and reduced the pressure on the NHS during the pandemic. For too long over multiple governments a division has been created between NHS staff and its perceived lesser cousins working in health and social care, this was again highlighted with the initial clap for the NHS, I was so pleased to see this adopted for all frontline Key workers. The CARE badge was meant to help with the levelling up between Health and Social care and The NHS, although the idea was positive in reality this was merely a gesture, I wear mine daily with pride, “My badge of Honour” as an ex- Health Minister coined. This led to an urgent question in Parliament on the matter by Lord Rogan. In total 15,000 were distributed before supplies ran out. In the United Kingdom we have 1.5 million care workers, giving only 1% of care staff access to one. Until Health and Social Care and the NHS are treated equally the divide will remain.

During the Pandemic at Komplex Care we took the decision that keeping our clients and staff safe was the priority, we did not actively look take on new business. This was not the same for all care providers. Recruiting staff in all areas of care is a challenge but finding resolute and committed people that want to take the level of responsibility required to care for our clients is exceptionally hard.

Recruitment of fresh staff declined during the pandemic. This led us to only commit to our current client group. We initially had an influx of applications from candidates that had never worked in care those inspired to help others and those that had unfortunately lost an income and were not entitled to government support schemes. The recruitment of new care staff during the lockdowns proposed new questions, how can we deliver training? A whole new training plan and how we would deliver it was devised to equip our workforce with the appropriate skills to deliver high quality care. We also embraced technology, Zoom Teams, and the like, but we have gone even further forward, digital care planning E-mar, Virtual assessment, and web-based recruitment. Implementing technology gives us a greater oversite and flexibility for our clients in the delivery of their care. This has also reduced our carbon Footprint; we are doing our bit!

 

Our clients and their families have all seen Covid in different ways, just the same as the rest of the UK and the world! we have some clients that have been and remain very cautious, those that were advised to shield but decided against it, some that think its and over reaction. The one constant has been their understanding that we were dealing with a threat that no one had the full facts and our guidance and advise was and remains likely to change. When the PPE supply chains eased, it went from one extreme to another. The operational and logistical skills demonstrated by my teams would rival some of the multinational delivery companies, I can see the picture now of our staff fully kitted in personal protective equipment transferring other kit into each other’s cars in supermarket car parks and lonely motorway services.

The long-awaited white paper on the future of social care “People at The Heart of Care” was published by the government in December 2021. The paper proposes just as many questions as it has attempted to resolve. All staff either working within Health and Care must be rewarded appropriately. The costs associated in delivering care have risen during the pandemic, it is not only staff pay that needs to rise a commitment to care providers is required so we are able to offer better terms and conditions.

 

As we came out of Lockdowns, Komplex Care have received many enquiries for our services, this is obviously a good thing for our business, however we have heard from some of these new enquiries they have not received a good standard of care, which is extremely sad to hear in our industry. At Komplex Care we ensure ‘care’ is at the heart of everything we do, it must be safe, and it must be the best for our clients. Commissioning Teams are inundating us with referrals, they are really struggling to find care provision. Our ability to take on new business is driven by recruitment, whether it be, nursing assistants, support workers, registered nurses, operational support, and even recruiters, Healthcare is not an easy industry to work in and with the new variant of Omicron this may potentially get worse before it gets better. The compulsory vaccination for our sector will also have an impact. We take this into account with all new applications and have seen candidates withdraw when advised it will be a requirement. Many of our client group will not accept staff if they have not received the Covid – 19 vaccines. At Komplex Care we promote choice and look to support our clients and staff. The uptake of vaccine has been high with our current workforce, and we have worked on providing factual information for any of our staff and clients that required any additional advice. I think the communication on the benefits and reasoning why we vaccinate the health and social care frontline workers would have been a far better way to keep all healthcare staff engaged and committed to the vaccine role out.

Soaring Energy Bills Leave Vulnerable People without Heating

Soaring Energy Bills Leave Vulnerable People without Heating

Soaring Energy Bills Leave Vulnerable People without Heating

Soaring Energy Bills Leave Vulnerable People without Heating

As energy prices continue to increase, Age UK, a leading national charity, raises concerns over the impact this will have on the elderly and their wellbeing.“Older energy bill payers are more likely to live in fuel poverty, which is expected to reach record highs in the UK this year.” (The Guardian, 2022).

If you’re concerned about yourself or a loved one, regarding your energy bills, Age UK have provided some helpful resources on the following link:

Robots rise to meet the challenge of caring for old people…

- Robots rise to meet the challenge of caring for old people -

- Robots rise to meet the challenge of caring for old people -

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Assistive robots have not quite reached the level of The Jetsons, the animated 1960s sitcom in which Rosie the robot maid zipped around a futuristic house doing all the chores people would rather avoid. But in a few years, robotic assistants might routinely feature in older people’s homes, helping them to care for themselves, providing emotional support, and allowing remote access for doctors and nurses. In retirement homes, they could entertain residents or help with cleaning. And in hospitals, they are already taking over some basic tasks, freeing up nurses to focus on patient care.

Assistive robots have not quite reached the level of The Jetsons, the animated 1960s sitcom in which Rosie the robot maid zipped around a futuristic house doing all the chores people would rather avoid. But in a few years, robotic assistants might routinely feature in older people’s homes, helping them to care for themselves, providing emotional support, and allowing remote access for doctors and nurses. In retirement homes, they could entertain residents or help with cleaning. And in hospitals, they are already taking over some basic tasks, freeing up nurses to focus on patient care.

Flu Vaccine

FLU VACCINES

FLU VACCINES

The flu vaccine is a safe and effective vaccine. It’s offered every year on the NHS to help protect people at risk of getting seriously ill from flu.

The best time to have the flu vaccine is in the autumn or early winter before flu starts spreading. But you can get the vaccine later.

Flu vaccine and coronavirus (COVID-19)

Flu vaccination is important because:

  • more people are likely to get flu this winter as fewer people will have built up natural immunity to it during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • if you get flu and COVID-19 at the same time, research shows you’re more likely to be seriously ill
  • getting vaccinated against flu and COVID-19 will provide protection for you and those around you for both these serious illnesses

If you’ve had COVID-19, it’s safe to have the flu vaccine. It will still be effective at helping to prevent flu.

COVID-19 booster vaccine

Some people may be eligible for both the flu and the COVID-19 booster vaccines.

If you are offered both vaccines, it’s safe to have them at the same time.

Find out more about the COVID-19 booster vaccine and who can get it

Who can have the flu vaccine?

The flu vaccine is given free on the NHS to people who:

  • are 50 and over (including those who’ll be 50 by 31 March 2022)
  • have certain health conditions
  • are pregnant
  • are in long-stay residential care
  • receive a carer’s allowance, or are the main carer for an older or disabled person who may be at risk if you get sick
  • live with someone who is more likely to get infections (such as someone who has HIV, has had a transplant or is having certain treatments for cancer, lupus or rheumatoid arthritis)
  • frontline health or social care workers

Where to get the flu vaccine

You can have the NHS flu vaccine at:

  • your GP surgery
  • a pharmacy offering the service
  • your midwifery service if you’re pregnant
  • a hospital appointment

If you do not have your flu vaccine at your GP surgery, you do not have to tell the surgery. This will be done for you.

Important

It’s important to go to your vaccination appointments unless you have symptoms of COVID-19.

How to book your appointment

If you’re eligible for a free flu vaccine, you can book an appointment at your GP surgery or a pharmacy that offers it on the NHS. You may also get an invitation to get the vaccine, but you do not have to wait for this before booking an appointment. Everyone who is eligible for the free flu vaccine will be able to get it.

GP surgeries and pharmacies get the flu vaccine in batches. If you cannot get an appointment straight away, ask if you can book an appointment for when more vaccines are available.

If you have an appointment for a COVID-19 booster vaccine at a GP surgery or pharmacy, you may also be offered a flu vaccine at the same time.

Do not delay booking your flu vaccine appointment so that you can get both vaccines together. Only some people will be offered both vaccines at the same time.

Flu vaccine for people with long-term health conditions

The flu vaccine is offered free on the NHS to anyone with a serious long-term health condition, including:

 

Talk to your doctor if you have a long-term condition that is not in one of these groups. They should offer you the flu vaccine if they think you’re at risk of serious problems if you get flu.

Flu vaccine if you’re pregnant

You should have the flu vaccine if you’re pregnant to help protect you and your baby.

It’s safe to have the flu vaccine at any stage of pregnancy.

Find out more about the flu vaccine in pregnancy

Flu vaccine for frontline health and social care workers

If you’re a frontline health and social care worker, your employer should offer you a flu vaccine. They may give the vaccine at your workplace.

You can also have an NHS flu vaccine at a GP surgery or a pharmacy if:

  • you’re a health or social care worker employed by a registered residential care or nursing home, registered homecare organisation or a hospice
  • you work in NHS primary care (such as in a GP surgery, pharmacy, dental surgery or opticians) and have direct contact with patients – this includes contractors, non-clinical staff and locums
  • you provide health or social care through direct payments or personal health budgets, or both

Who should not have the flu vaccine

 

Most adults can have the flu vaccine, but you should avoid it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a flu vaccine in the past.

You may be at risk of an allergic reaction to the flu vaccine injection if you have an egg allergy. This is because some flu vaccines are made using eggs.

Ask a GP or pharmacist for a low-egg or egg-free vaccine.

If you’re ill with a high temperature, it’s best to wait until you’re better before having the flu vaccine.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

 

The flu vaccine gives the best protection against flu. Flu vaccines help protect against the main types of flu viruses, although there’s still a chance you might get flu. If you do get flu after vaccination, it’s likely to be milder and not last as long. Having the flu vaccine will also stop you spreading flu to other people who may be more at risk of serious problems from flu. It can take 10 to 14 days for the flu vaccine to work.

Flu vaccine side effects

 

Flu vaccines are very safe. All adult flu vaccines are given by injection into the muscle of the upper arm.

Most side effects are mild and only last for a day or so, such as:

  • slightly raised temperature
  • muscle aches
  • sore arm where the needle went in – this is more likely to happen with the vaccine for people aged 65 and over

Try these tips to help reduce the discomfort:

  • continue to move your arm regularly
  • take a painkiller, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen – some people, including those who are pregnant, should not take ibuprofen unless a doctor recommends it

Allergic reactions to the flu vaccine

 

It’s very rare for anyone to have a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to the flu vaccine. If this does happen, it usually happens within minutes.

The person who vaccinates you will be trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

Report a side effect

 

Anyone can report a suspected side effect of a vaccine through the Yellow Card Scheme.

Flu vaccine ingredients

 

There are several types of injected flu vaccine. None of them contain live viruses so they cannot give you flu.

If you’re eligible for the flu vaccine on the NHS, you’ll be offered one that’s most effective for you, depending on your age:

  • adults aged 18 to 64 – there are different types, including low-egg and egg-free ones
  • adults aged 65 and over – the most common one contains an extra ingredient to help your immune system make a stronger response to the vaccine

Children aged between 6 months and 2 years who have a long-term health condition are offered an approved injected flu vaccine instead of the nasal spray vaccine.

Find out about the children’s nasal spray flu vaccine

Talk to a GP, practice nurse or pharmacist for more information about these vaccines.

Information:

Read more about why vaccines are safe and important, including how they work and what they contain.

 
Link To original Article: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/flu-influenza-vaccine/

The flu vaccine is a safe and effective vaccine. It’s offered every year on the NHS to help protect people at risk of getting seriously ill from flu.

The best time to have the flu vaccine is in the autumn or early winter before flu starts spreading. But you can get the vaccine later.

Flu vaccine and coronavirus (COVID-19)

Flu vaccination is important because:

  • more people are likely to get flu this winter as fewer people will have built up natural immunity to it during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • if you get flu and COVID-19 at the same time, research shows you’re more likely to be seriously ill
  • getting vaccinated against flu and COVID-19 will provide protection for you and those around you for both these serious illnesses

 

If you’ve had COVID-19, it’s safe to have the flu vaccine. It will still be effective at helping to prevent flu.

COVID-19 booster vaccine

Some people may be eligible for both the flu and the COVID-19 booster vaccines.

If you are offered both vaccines, it’s safe to have them at the same time.

Find out more about the COVID-19 booster vaccine and who can get it

Who can have the flu vaccine?

The flu vaccine is given free on the NHS to people who:

  • are 50 and over (including those who’ll be 50 by 31 March 2022)
  • have certain health conditions
  • are pregnant
  • are in long-stay residential care
  • receive a carer’s allowance, or are the main carer for an older or disabled person who may be at risk if you get sick
  • live with someone who is more likely to get infections (such as someone who has HIV, has had a transplant or is having certain treatments for cancer, lupus or rheumatoid arthritis)
  • frontline health or social care workers

Where to get the flu vaccine

You can have the NHS flu vaccine at:

  • your GP surgery
  • a pharmacy offering the service
  • your midwifery service if you’re pregnant
  • a hospital appointment

If you do not have your flu vaccine at your GP surgery, you do not have to tell the surgery. This will be done for you.

Important

It’s important to go to your vaccination appointments unless you have symptoms of COVID-19.

How to book your appointment

If you’re eligible for a free flu vaccine, you can book an appointment at your GP surgery or a pharmacy that offers it on the NHS. You may also get an invitation to get the vaccine, but you do not have to wait for this before booking an appointment. Everyone who is eligible for the free flu vaccine will be able to get it.

GP surgeries and pharmacies get the flu vaccine in batches. If you cannot get an appointment straight away, ask if you can book an appointment for when more vaccines are available.

If you have an appointment for a COVID-19 booster vaccine at a GP surgery or pharmacy, you may also be offered a flu vaccine at the same time.

Do not delay booking your flu vaccine appointment so that you can get both vaccines together. Only some people will be offered both vaccines at the same time.

Flu vaccine for people with long-term health conditions

The flu vaccine is offered free on the NHS to anyone with a serious long-term health condition, including:

 

Talk to your doctor if you have a long-term condition that is not in one of these groups. They should offer you the flu vaccine if they think you’re at risk of serious problems if you get flu.

Flu vaccine if you’re pregnant

You should have the flu vaccine if you’re pregnant to help protect you and your baby.

It’s safe to have the flu vaccine at any stage of pregnancy.

Find out more about the flu vaccine in pregnancy

Flu vaccine for frontline health and social care workers

If you’re a frontline health and social care worker, your employer should offer you a flu vaccine. They may give the vaccine at your workplace.

You can also have an NHS flu vaccine at a GP surgery or a pharmacy if:

  • you’re a health or social care worker employed by a registered residential care or nursing home, registered homecare organisation or a hospice
  • you work in NHS primary care (such as in a GP surgery, pharmacy, dental surgery or opticians) and have direct contact with patients – this includes contractors, non-clinical staff and locums
  • you provide health or social care through direct payments or personal health budgets, or both

Who should not have the flu vaccine

 

Most adults can have the flu vaccine, but you should avoid it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a flu vaccine in the past.

You may be at risk of an allergic reaction to the flu vaccine injection if you have an egg allergy. This is because some flu vaccines are made using eggs.

Ask a GP or pharmacist for a low-egg or egg-free vaccine.

If you’re ill with a high temperature, it’s best to wait until you’re better before having the flu vaccine.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

 

The flu vaccine gives the best protection against flu. Flu vaccines help protect against the main types of flu viruses, although there’s still a chance you might get flu. If you do get flu after vaccination, it’s likely to be milder and not last as long. Having the flu vaccine will also stop you spreading flu to other people who may be more at risk of serious problems from flu. It can take 10 to 14 days for the flu vaccine to work.

Flu vaccine side effects

 

Flu vaccines are very safe. All adult flu vaccines are given by injection into the muscle of the upper arm.

Most side effects are mild and only last for a day or so, such as:

  • slightly raised temperature
  • muscle aches
  • sore arm where the needle went in – this is more likely to happen with the vaccine for people aged 65 and over

 

Try these tips to help reduce the discomfort:

  • continue to move your arm regularly
  • take a painkiller, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen – some people, including those who are pregnant, should not take ibuprofen unless a doctor recommends it

Allergic reactions to the flu vaccine

 

It’s very rare for anyone to have a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to the flu vaccine. If this does happen, it usually happens within minutes.

The person who vaccinates you will be trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

Report a side effect

 

Anyone can report a suspected side effect of a vaccine through the Yellow Card Scheme.

Flu vaccine ingredients

 

There are several types of injected flu vaccine. None of them contain live viruses so they cannot give you flu.

If you’re eligible for the flu vaccine on the NHS, you’ll be offered one that’s most effective for you, depending on your age:

  • adults aged 18 to 64 – there are different types, including low-egg and egg-free ones
  • adults aged 65 and over – the most common one contains an extra ingredient to help your immune system make a stronger response to the vaccine

 

Children aged between 6 months and 2 years who have a long-term health condition are offered an approved injected flu vaccine instead of the nasal spray vaccine.

Find out about the children’s nasal spray flu vaccine

Talk to a GP, practice nurse or pharmacist for more information about these vaccines.

Information:

Read more about why vaccines are safe and important, including how they work and what they contain.

Link To original Article: 
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/flu-influenza-vaccine/

 

Daily rapid testing for COVID-19 contacts launches this week

Daily rapid testing for COVID-19 contacts launches this week

Daily rapid testing for COVID-19 contacts launches this week

  • From Tuesday (DECEMBER 14th), fully vaccinated contacts of a COVID-19 case should take a daily LFD test for seven days to slow the spread of the virus 
  • Those who test positive or develop symptoms will need to self-isolate 
  • Unvaccinated adults must continue to self-isolate for 10 days if they are a contact of someone with COVID-19 
  • It follows a significant rise in Omicron cases in the UK with the new variant expected to become the dominant strain by mid-December 
 

From Tuesday 14 December, people who are fully vaccinated and identified as a contact of someone with COVID-19 – whether Omicron or not – should take an NHS rapid lateral flow test every day for seven days to help slow the spread of COVID-19. 

The practical move comes as Omicron infections are rising significantly in the UK and it is expected to become the dominant strain in the UK by mid-December. It aims to reduce pressures on people’s everyday lives by replacing the requirement for Omicron contacts to isolate for 10 days, while protecting the public by identifying asymptomatic cases and stopping the chains of transmission. Testing daily will also help us understand how and where the virus is spreading. 

Close contacts of people who test positive are at higher risk of getting COVID-19 and, with one in three people asymptomatic, daily testing will help ensure people are not unknowingly passing the virus on to others. 

As now, anyone whose rapid test comes back positive or who develops COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate and take a confirmatory PCR test to verify the result. If the PCR result comes back positive, contacts must self-isolate for 10 days from the day they took the positive rapid test or developed symptoms. They do not need to continue taking rapid tests during that 10 day isolation period. If the PCR result comes back negative, contacts can leave self-isolation but should continue to take rapid tests for the remainder of the 7 days. 

Anyone identified as a contact with a negative LFD is strongly advised to limit close contact with other people outside their household, especially in crowded or enclosed spaces and with anyone who is more vulnerable. They should also follow government guidance on wearing a face covering and working from home where possible. 

Unvaccinated adults are not eligible for this new daily testing policy, they must self-isolate for 10 days if they are a contact of someone who tests positive for COVID-19 – Omicron or not – unless eligible for an existing workplace daily contact testing. 

Health and Social Care Secretary Sajid Javid said: 

The Omicron variant is quickly gaining ground in the UK and is expected to become the dominant strain by mid-December. 

“We are taking this proportionate and more practical measure to limit the impact on people’s day to day lives while helping to reduce the spread of Omicron. 

“Vaccines remain our best defence and I urge anyone yet to get a first and second jab to come forward and those eligible for a booster to get boosted as soon as possible.” 

Dr Jenny Harries, UKHSA CEO said: 

“If you are identified as a contact of someone with COVID-19, taking a rapid daily test – and only needing to isolate if it is positive – will help reduce the spread of the virus and minimise its impact on our everyday lives over the coming weeks and months. Rapid tests are freely available in pharmacies and online. Our latest analysis shows that boosters provide the best protection against the Omicron variant, please go forward when you are called. If you haven’t had any vaccine, a first and second dose still gives you protection against becoming seriously unwell. Don’t worry about stepping forwards now – you will be warmly welcomed by our vaccination staff and I would strongly advise you to get vaccinated as soon as possible.” 

People will be contacted by NHS Test and Trace by phone, email or text or they will receive a notification from the NHS COVID-19 app to tell them they are a contact of someone who tested positive and what action they need to take. 

They will be advised to get a box of 7 lateral flow tests free of charge from NHS Test and Trace either through pharmacies, schools or home delivery by ordering online. People are encouraged to use the tests they already have at home before ordering more. People should take these tests from the day they are notified as being a contact and report their results to NHS Test and Trace on GOV.UK or by calling 119. 

Testing with isolation remains a vital tool in controlling the spread of Omicron given how quickly it passes from person to person. Extensive clinical evaluation shows lateral flow tests are accurate and sensitive enough to be used in the community and detect 80-90% people that are highly infectious very quickly, so more people who are at a high likelihood of spreading the virus isolate and prevent the variant from spreading to others. 

The Prime Minister confirmed on Wednesday 8 December that England will move to Plan B following the rapid spread of the Omicron variant in the UK. This means people are advised to work from home where possible and face coverings are compulsory in most indoor venues, such as cinemas, theatres and places of worship. 

The UK Health Security Agency published preliminary data on Friday showing COVID-19 booster vaccines provide around 70 to 75 per cent protection against symptomatic infection from the Omicron variant. The data showed that two doses of AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines alone provided much lower levels of protection against symptomatic infection compared to the protection that they provide against Delta, stressing the importance of people getting their booster jabs. 

The Government and NHS have expanded the booster programme to all adults and all over-18s in England will be offered a top-up dose by the end of January. People aged 30 and over will be invited to book from Monday 13 December and the NHS will invite younger people in due course in order of age. 

To speed up the booster programme, around 450 military personnel have been drafted in to support deployment, with 1,500 community pharmacy sites, additional hospital hubs, and pop-up sites opening in convenient locations across the country. Extra financial support to GPs, community pharmacies and primary care staff will help boost capacity and encourage more visits to those who are housebound. 

Shropshire Star Article

Care Company looking to recruit and build on 'Good' CQC rating

Care Company looking to recruit and build on 'Good' CQC rating

Komplex Care, based in Telford, wants to expand its team to meet a growing demand for its services. It comes as the business recently appointed Arron Zaib as its new managing director. Mr Zaib said: “Overall, in the whole of the UK there is a shortage of care staff. We are no different to anyone else.”

“I think there was a hope that with furlough starting to end there would be an influx of people looking for roles. “Currently, we are looking to taken on 15 new people across the whole of the business. “We are working with local colleges to get younger people into care.”

“We have made contact with Telford, Wolverhampton, Halesowen and South Birmingham colleges. It’s important to me that we invest in local people.

’We can take on staff that have not done care before but have got great personal skills that we can work on and train them up to provide really good care. We can also move our staff around to give them a greater opportunity.” Komplex Care provides a multitude of care services for both adults and children that includes domiciliary, complex care requirements, live-in carers, financial support and nursing care.

It was recently given a ‘Good’ rating in its latest inspection by the Care Quality Commission. Mr Zaib added: “Following our recent Care Quality Commission inspection and receiving a ‘Good’ rating in all domains we are looking to build on this fantastic achievement.

“A quality service is at the forefront of our minds. Komplex Care are not looking to be the biggest, just the best. I want Komplex Care to be the first choice for every commissioner or client seeking care.

"I want Komplex to get an 'Outstanding' rating with the CQC – that's the target I have set our team."